2018 / December 2018

Good old times (Auld lang syne)

Photo by Meagan Paddock on Unsplash

So, we all sing (I might be being a bit generous here, in my case more caterwauling!) this every New Year’s Eve, but what is Auld Lang Syne all about and why is it such a tradition?

Well, looking at the first verse, the theme seems to be remembering people and the good times we’ve had with them. Verses two, three and four seem to be about sharing a drink and generally hanging out with friends. The chorus again seems to echo the same sentiment, remembering good times and sharing kindness.

Nice, but how has this become an essential New Year’s anthem? Well, for my money there is something about this time of year when we recognise the end of what has been and the start of something new.

The turn of the year offers us the opportunity to consider a fresh start, to start new habits, end old ones, and to make fresh decisions. Whilst there is no reason why we can’t do this any other time, there seems something poignant about the turn of the year as a symbolic time of change.

Fundamental to all new starts is the recognition that there has already been a journey to the point where the decision has been made to try something new. The turn of the year not only offers us the symbolic opportunity to make new starts, but also to look back, celebrate and recognise the journey undertaken so far, and those who have supported us on it.

So, this year, as we remember good old times, let’s not just do it with a sense of nostalgia. Instead, lets do it with a recognition of all the help we’ve had along the way. Let’s commit to continuing to share a cup of kindness with those supporting us as we continue our journey forward.

Author

hello@realigncoaching.co.uk
Providing innovative, high quality community life coach training and professional, social skills and wellbeing workshops at an affordable cost. Dave is a former Senior Probation Officer, now founder and director of Metanoeo CIC, Realign Coaching and Theolotweet Academy. He also lectures in Psychosocial Analysis and Community Wellbeing and is a community life coach and trainer. Dave holds a BA in Bible and Theology, BA(Hons) in Community Justice, MA in Criminal Justice and PhD in Theology. He is a member of the Association for Coaching, a Fellow of the School for Social Entrepreneurs, a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy and also a community member of Forum Housing Association.

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